Don’t Judge a Book by its Pictures!

Last week Kindergarten read picture books and then created a sentence response to a book. Most students took up the challenge of writing another sentence, demonstrating two ideas they recalled from the picture book.

Kindergarten always enjoy picture books filled with colours, detailed drawings, and humour presented by the characters as they have the text read to them.

Reading is great fun, however thinking about the story creates lively discussions, and writing about the book is becoming easier.

Each week the primary teachers have an instructional leader visit to observe a lesson or demonstronstrate a lesson following the explicit direct instruction or EDI teaching model. This process is like iron sharpening iron; teachers continue to grow and develop their teaching skills in a safe and encouraging way.

Last week I had the pleasure of demonstrating a lesson in Year 6, focusing on the intended audience, the key message and how the layout of the text supports the key message to the reader.

Year 6 read three picture books! At first there were surprised faces, yet as the story unfolded and discussion increased the students realised how a simple picture book could present deeper themes.

Themes of acceptance of difference, communication can prevent battles, having the courage to think outside the square and to be mindful not to put people in a category box or tall tower.

It was fabulous to see the older students enjoy, laugh and think deeply about a picture book and be surprised by all that they could learn from it.

At PCS teachers work hard to ensure that students continue to get the best learning experience. PCS also strives to promote students’ understanding of others, looking past the surface and to think deeply about seeing the capabilities of everyone.

Mrs Harris